How to Install a Rubbermaid Fast Track Rail System (With Pictures)

The Fast Track system may come with directions and hardware for you to install everything, but here’s an overview of the process and the resulting shelving units with some pictures.

These things are fairly easy to install, and come with all the needed hardware.  Either through improper use on my part or a genuine weakness in their design, I had a hard time using the included drywall anchors.  Instead, I picked up some #8 Tripple-grip anchors.  These seemed to work very well, and were easy to install.  They come complete with their own masonry bit, so that was one less thing to worry about.

Once you have all the materials that you will need, line up the rail using a stud-finder in a position that maximises the number of screws that can be drilled into studs, preferably starting with one.  Once you have a start position picked out, drill a pilot hole for this screw and attach one of the screws loosely.


Make your Rails straight:

With this first screw as a support, use a level to get your rail parallel to the ground.  Hold it tightly to the wall and mark each hole with a marker.  Let the rail move out of position and, with the aid of a stud-finder, mark those that have studs behind them differently than the others.  Drill a pilot hole for the studs, and another set of holes with a masonry bit for the drywall anchors to go into.  Re-align your rail on the wall and screw everything in.

Attach the Vertical Supports:

With this done, temporarily attach the vertical supports to the horizontal rail.  Mark, remove the support, and drill for a stud or drywall anchor as appropriate.  Re-attach and screw everything in securely.  A level or laser-level can be used to get these perfectly vertical

fast track rail above mill with tools broom mopAdd Shelving and Accessories:

Once you have this done, you can attach whatever shelving unit, bike rack, or tool holder that you want to your Fast-track rails.  They aren’t cheap, but when compared to what a garage costs per square foot – roughly $50 – it doesn’t seem too bad.  I’ve definitely been able to more fully utilise my garage with this set, and highly recommend it!

As for my actual opinions on this system, I give more of a review of it in a previous post.  As of this writing, Rubbermaid hasn’t paid me to endorse this product in any way.  However, I’ve put the stuff that I use on my “aStore” under “Garage Organisation,” so you can use the same stuff that I do if you want.  Or just use this link to shop for Fasttrack stuff directly on Amazon.  I do get a small cut off of those links!

4 Comments.

  1. Expanding Rubbermaid FastTrack Shelves to fit more stuff - pingback on October 18, 2012 at 6:42 am
  2. I just finished installing this system in a closet, with the horizontal rail up at the ceiling level. This has the advantage of putting all screws into the wall header. But I was disappointed to find that when the rail is at the ceiling, you can’t hang the vertical brackets on it, because it hits the ceiling. As a result, all the brackets had to be put on at the end of the rail. I used #10, 3″ screws and then found that the brackets wouldn’t slide past them, so I had to back the screws out one at a time to get the brackets past.

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